WUMB February Program Guide

From the Studio

Introducing Cha-Chi’s Breakfast With The Beatles!

This month Breakfast With The Beatles will revisit the very first time The Beatles performed on The Ed Sullivan Show over 50 years ago on February 9th 1964. On February 10th we’ll hear the 5 songs The Beatles performed live to a TV audience of 73 million people. We’ll also listen to news clips and actualities surrounding the first time The Beatles arrived in New York City including excerpts from The Beatles very first U.S. press conference. Read More…

Well, There Goes January….

Can you feel those New Year’s resolutions slipping away?  I thought of that the other day while I walked to the subway, the hamstring muscles in my legs feeling morning soreness – as if to remind me that this is the year I will use the winter time to get into better shape for spring and summer.  Right!  Right??  Sigh.  There’s still time… Read More…

Spinning Out the Winter on H61….

-hello again, hard to believe we’re already in February of 2018, so six, yes, six more weeks of winter. The first weekend of February on H61 we’ll be acknowledging the birthday of one of my favorites, Al Kooper. Dylan, Blues Project, BS&T, Super Session: what a resume!! Graham Nash as well: the Hollies, CSN(Y), solo work, and LP’s released with David Crosby during so-called ‘down time’. Read More…

Live Guests? That’s Different!

Greetings, all! As we careen into February I’ve been busy curating some pretty interesting shows. Digging deep into the archives of vintage hillbilly music from the dawn of recorded music in the 1920’s all the way to today… but mostly dead artists from before 1970, as always. With one very glaring exception… I’m bringing in some live guests on Feb 24th, Ben Wetherbee and Ruth Rappaport, a mother/son old-timey duet that is kicking some serious butt. Read More…

Goodness Gracious, Otis Blackwell!

February is Black History month in the US, and while every month is Black History month in my book, we on the Morning Show will pay particular attention to several artists and their significant  contributions to American (and global) culture throughout the month. Read More…

Another Great Month of Music on Celtic Twilight

On February 4 we honor Susan McKeown, Dublin-born singer/songwriter who celebrates a birthday this week. She initially studied opera before turning to folk and world music. Always unique, she has recorded an album of Yiddish and Irish folk songs with the Klezmatics as well as an original album exploring madness and mental illness.  Read More…

Tales That Need Telling

Folk Tales marks Black History Month with a couple of too-seldom-told tales. February 10, it’s the Civil Rights Movement’s front-line group, the Freedom Singers. February 17, the remarkable story of how one of the most important songs in American musical history became a ‘60s cliche, “Michael, Row the Boat Ashore.” What we don’t know about that song matters so much more than what we think we know. Read More…

This Month on the Dixie Bee Line!

Brrr!! Happy New Year, all! So I had fun with the Christmas and New Years shows, hopefully you were able to catch them. But there’s plenty of red meat left for January… with these chilly winds you should stay in and listen to the radio 🙂 Read More…

Warming Up the New Year on Folk Tales

We’ll warm up the Folk Tales corral with some January fun, including visits with two of folkdom’s favorite legends, Tom Rush and Rosalie Sorrels; Fairport Convention, who put the British into British folk-rock; a birthday toast to Robert Burns; and some folk mysteries, like the classic song Joni Mitchell thought was “probably terrible;” why klezmer music is called “the blues of Europe;” the fiddler who’s one of Linda Ronstadt’s favorite singers; why Harry Belafonte thought Bob Dylan hated him––and what changed his mind after 40 years. Along with lots of great music, some old familiars and some surprises.

~Scott Alarik

Perry Persoff — Looking Back to Look Forward…

Funny how looking back – looking at what was – can be a springboard to going forward. I might get dinged in Logic Class for that sentiment. But of course, the poets would say, “but of course.” Read More…