WUMB September Program Guide

From the Studio

Le Bon Temps Rouler, Le Bon Temp Hootenanny, Texas Troubadours & the Birth Of the Blues

Folk Tales begins a busy September on the 1st with Nanci Griffith, the Texas songwriter who helped reinvent the folk career after the ‘60s revival. September 8, we two-step next door to Cajun country, and how their rollicking good-time music became the blood-brother of the blues. Read More…

Golden Brown Texture Like Sun

Summer’s winding down. Even if I wasn’t looking at a calendar, I can just feel it – the slight drop in temperature in the morning, the dip in humidity at night. For some people, the seasonal transition signals back to school or back to a regular work routine. For me, it indicates I need to get serious about plotting my annual escape to a snow-free place in January or February, preferably one with coastal sage or Manuka trees. Regardless of the subtle temperature shifts, it’s still technically summer until September 21. I’ll just keep wearing my sandals and enjoying all the summer music until further notice. Read More…

Banjos and Fiddles, Oh My!

September is my favorite month.  Not just because it’s my birthday month (though it is) but because of the 38th Annual Lowell Banjo & Fiddle Contest.  This is the last event in the Lowell Summer Music Series, and has been for ages.  It’s the Saturday AFTER Labor Day, 9/8, as always, at Boarding House Park in Downtown Lowell.  I hope you’ll come!  I’m emceeing the event, not that that should bias me (but it does) — note this is a part of New England music history.  Bring a lawn chair, 12 – 5pm.  Raindate across the street in the High School.  It’s fun.  Read More…

The Jig

I was watching a few young girls practice Irish step dancing on my street the other day and that got me to ask, what is a jig? Read More…

South America Over the Airwaves…

I’d like to start this time by thanking all the people who continue to listen to live radio in an environment where computer driven data is the majority of what’s on the air and on the web. As in “oh you like that, here’s some more of the same..” It’s marketing as applied to musical tastes- logical as far as it goes, and certainly good for selling things, but maybe in the longer run is depriving many of us of the challenge of hearing unfamiliar music, and perhaps by extension unfamiliar cultures. Don’t misunderstand, I’ve certainly heard some wonderful stuff I wouldn’t have known was out there through computer selected playlists, but having actual people curating has its advantages, too! Read More…

September In The Rain

Whenever September returns I am immediately reminded of one of the Beatles early recordings, so early that our friend Mr. Pete Best is featured on drums. It’s called “September In The Rain,” recorded on January 1, 1962. You can just about bet on that recording being played sometime this month on Breakfast With The Beatles. Read More…

Easing Into Fall on H61

-soooo…it being the first of September, I gather, according to meteorologists, it is now officially autumn…which means it’s a tad easier to come into work Saturday mornings to host Highway 61 Revisited without feeling like I’m missing out on the good weather…which also explains why we’ve found more of you good people tune in for the repeat Sunday evenings during June/July/August… Read More…

Local Folk Alert!

We spent some time with Rhode Island bands on Sunday Aug 5th.  On August 12th we’ll look at what I humbly think are some of the best new releases by area bands so far in 2018. Read More…

Folk Tales Goes Full-Tilt Hootenanny

August marks a new milestone for Folk Tales. On the 11th and 18th, we’ll air our first Folk Tales/WUMB Members Concert, “A Pete Seeger Hootenanny,” starring Alastair Moock, Antje DuvekotDanielle Miraglia, and Dinty Child honoring Seeger’s spirit with a rafter-raising show. Read More…

1969 – The End of the Beginning, or The End of the Innocence?

One Year at a Time takes a listen to 1969, stopping off in Woodstock, and traveling down south to sample the work of Duane Allman, up to the Dakotas for the eternal Peggy Lee, and finally out to San Francisco, to hear an influence on Led Zeppelin‘s first album that went uncredited for decades. Read More…